Flights of Fancy

Art. Design. Science. Food. Geekdom. Fandom.

1,887 notes

unicornempire:

Salt & Burn is finally available online! It’s been a long and winding road, but now you and your friends can hunt the things that go bump in the night! Play as a Hunter of the supernatural that travels the board, killing monster and saving lives. The first Hunter to save 10 lives wins the game! You can read more about the game in the Etsy listing or visit saltandburn.com to see other people playing the game and read the rules.

We also have the Bitten Booster Pack and the Brothers Booster Pack available, each one adding extra gameplay and alternate methods of play.

Due to problems with our laser cutter, we only have enough of the original laser-cut acrylic player tokens and hearts for 25-30 games. After those are sold, we’re going to be revisiting the game and replacing the tokens with cardboard chits, so if you want to get the full original game, here’s your chance. Thanks guys, happy hunting!

(via geek-studio)

Filed under holy balls i want it get in my life board games gorgeous design

43,770 notes

luciawestwick:

do you remember the scene where Steve shows page from his notebook with all the things he missed while he’d been napping? so, this page is different for Russia. here it is

image

moreover, I found another 7 versions.

US page

image

UK list

image

version for South Korea

image

page for France 

image

Italian version

image

Mexican one

image

list for Spain

image

quite interesting, isn’t it? let me know if there are other versions)

update! Australian list (via idkvader)

image

Update №2! page for Brazilia. (via doctorwhoses)

image

(via mamasam)

Filed under Captain America: The First Avenger spoilers catws spoilers captain america the winter soldier spoilers so many spoilers but also not really FRANCE'S IS OFFICIALLY MY FAVORITE DAFT PUNK THE FIFTH ELEMENT YES GOOD

1,291 notes

10 Things Your Freelance Editor Might Not Tell You—but Should

referenceforwriters:

1. You should avoid the temptation to hire someone to edit your first draft.

I know you’re really excited that you finally finished that book! I’m happy for you … you should be happy for you. Celebrate it! But don’t send it to an editor yet. Put it away for three weeks and then reread, making notes on its strengths and weaknesses, asking yourself what’s missing, and flagging places where you find yourself skimming. Then rewrite the manuscript at least once—twice is better. Don’t bring in a professional until you have made the book the best you possibly can on your own. At this stage, you are still best equipped to take your book to the next level. Only when you’ve taken it as far as you can on your own will you get the most for your money in hiring a freelance editor. Which brings me to a related point:

2. An editor is not a ghostwriter.

It’s not uncommon for nonfiction clients especially to believe that because they have an outline, research notes or interview transcripts, their book is “almost done” and ready for an editor. But if you’re looking for someone to take any of the above and shape it into a manuscript, what you want is a ghostwriter. A nonfiction editor won’t do extensive research for you. A fiction editor is not going to invent characters, flesh out dialogue or write missing scenes. If you hire an editor to do a ghostwriter’s job, you’ll surely be disappointed with the outcome.

3. Your editor is likely to feel more invested in the kind of book she enjoys reading.

Your editor should be familiar with the conventions of what you write. You don’t want her suggesting, for instance, that you include an explicit sex scene in your Christian women’s fiction. Even more important, you want her to like your book enough to want it to be the best it can be. If a prospective editor seems lukewarm from the start about your manuscript or genre, walk away. Find an editor who exhibits genuine excitement about your project. This doesn’t mean that if you’ve written a young-adult paranormal vampire romance you need an editor who specializes solely in that genre. But it does mean that you don’t want an editor who hates teenagers, hates vampires and hates love stories.

Read More

(via clevergirlhelps)

Filed under writing editing important information note to self

65,230 notes

How to, like, write cover letters and resumes and know what jobs to apply to and shit.

randumcharacter:

morgulblade:

Basically I have been blessed to be close to people who work in hiring and were very, very willing to pass along their knowledge and tips and since a lot of people I know on here seem mystified by these things, I will share my vast wealth of knowledge with you*

*Some of this knowledge might be contradicted by specifics from your own field. If you’re a chemical engineer some of these things might not apply and that’s fine. This is just ~*widely applicable*~ stuff.

Cover Letters

Cover letters are the stupidest part of a job application. The cover letter is really only there to show two things: 1) That you have a command of language that is both accurate and appropriate; 2) you read the job listing.

  • Your cover letter should be short. The hirer has likely read hundreds that day, and by read, I mean “skimmed over lightly.” You don’t need to fill up an entire page. 
  • It should only contain pertinent information. Do not try to be cutesy or “creative” unless the job listing SPECIFICALLY asks for that. Trust me, I’ve had to hire people. Those people’s letters got passed around for mocking. DO NOT BE THAT PERSON.
  • It should speak to the job listing, but only enough that it shows that you read it. If the job listing emphasizes that they’re looking for somebody who is willing to work odd hours, throw in a line that in your past experience you have been noted for being flexible with time. It doesn’t need a Faulkner-length explanation.
  • If you know the name of the person to whom the letter is addressed, address it to them. If you it is a blind application, you don’t need to put “To Whom It May Concern” or “Dear Sir/Madam;” just don’t say anything.
  • Stop freaking out about it. Seriously, your CL is not nearly as scary as you think it is. If you want to see a screenshot if an example cover letter that is a “catch all,” click here. I just pulled this out of my ass for a fictional job/person.

Resumes

Your resume is not an “employment record.” Unless you have no experience, it should only list the things that are the most impressive or demonstrate your abilities the clearest. 

  • If you have an “Objective” on your resume, take it off. All of the employers I know said, “We KNOW your objective—you want the job! It just takes up space.” 
  • Always make sure that your resume is formatted cleanly and with maximum readability in mind. I strongly, strongly suggest visiting this link to see how to format your resume best. Visual cleanliness matters. 
  • Your resume should be ONE page. Just one. Not two or more
  • You can’t lie on your resume; you can learn how to make things sound more impressive. If you worked at a hair salon cleaning up, don’t say “Swept floors.” Instead write, “Contributed to the efficiency and cleanliness of the salon by sweeping floors.” It sounds like bullshit to you, but to a prospective employer, it sounds like you’re happy being part of a team. Try to describe what you did in at least 7 words.
  • You can divide your resume if you want to highlight certain experiences over others. Making two sections such as “Relevant Experience” and “Other Experience” breaks it up, allows the reader to skip around, and let’s you highlight what you want to highlight.
  • Learn to weed things out. Unless you can make it look like it taught you something huge, don’t waste the space. At the same time, if a job sucked but you can make it appear like it really impacted you, use it. This is not the truth about how you felt about that last job. This is you advertising yourself. You’re trying to get a job, not a Nobel Prize for emotional honesty. 
Now, what about the Skills section? You should have one, but as one friend said, “Nobody gives a shit if you went to France and had a great time. What we care about is if you’re proficient in French.” That should be your metric for things:
  • Only list experiences that would aid you in this job or a similar one—not things that were “cool.” This is the place for things that you’ve learned but perhaps can’t tie to a job. Examples: foreign language skills, clerical training, courses/certifications, etc. 
  • List all of the software that you know. Even if it doesn’t seem relevant to that job, weird things happen. List any MS Office/equivalent software, if you are familiar with both Mac and PC, any graphics editing software you know… 
  • SOCIAL MEDIA IS A THING THAT YOU SHOULD DEFINITELY MAKE KNOWN. To people ~30 and under, social media seems like a given. But to many employers, it’s a mystical world filled with equal amounts of marketing opportunities and terror. Make it clear what social networking sites you know how to use—obviously Facebook and Twitter, but also LinkedIn, Pinterest, Tumblr, etc. 

Applying to Jobs/Interviewing

Unfortunately, I can give you less specific advice here because we are not likely working in the same field—but here are just some general things to file away:

  • If there’s a job listing that you feel qualified for but the listing says it wants more years of experience than you have, apply anyway. Those employers are unlikely to find that unicorn that has 4+ years of experience and is willing to work basically minimum wage. While more experience is a plus, they really just want somebody who can do the job. When it comes to applying to jobs, you really have nothing to lose by applying to anything that tickles your fancy
  • Interviewing is an entire post unto itself, but I’ll give you the tips that I’ve been given by my people: be calm, be on time, and ask good questions. Always have some questions lined up, even if you already know the answer. “What are you looking for in the right candidate?” is a good example, or “Are there opportunities for growth within the company?” etc. 

Accepting a Job

So you got a job offer; exciting! Before you immediately accept, really vet the place to make sure it’s somewhere you’d like to work. Months of unemployment make you desperate, but sometimes jumping at the first opportunity it isn’t worth it. THIS HAPPENED TO ME, LEARN FROM MY MISTAKES

Things you should think about:

  • Do I know ALL things about the job, including: what I will be paid/how often, if there are benefits and when I get them, what hours I am working, how overtime is handled, how sick time is handled, etc. These are all incredibly important to know and if your employer is legitimate they will welcome you asking them. 
  • Is the distance commutable, or is it too far from home? (Think about how transit/gasoline will cut into your paycheck.)
  • Does the job give me the time necessary to do other important things?
  • Does the office environment seem like one I can spend at least six months in? (Every month at a bad job feels like an eternity—if you have bad feelings, trust them.) 
  • Does the job offer me anything besides a paycheck? Will I be learning any skills at this job or making important connections that can help me down the road?
IMPORTANT: If an employer tries to give you a W-9 tax form upon your hiring and you are NOT a freelancer (independent contractor), RUN. This is tax fraud and is very messy and is entirely there to screw you. Become familiar with the legal definition of a freelancer so you know if you’re walking into a shady place. It happens more than you’d think, and it sucks, and is weird.
If you have any questions, feel free to send me a message or whatever, I’ll gladly answer to the best of my ability! GO GET ‘EM. 

Vital information for your everyday life. 

(via foreverrhapsody)

Filed under always reblog note to self the great job search

20,783 notes

sailormichelle:

hey everyone !So my mom’s been feeling really down lately and i’m really hoping you guys can help me try to make her feel better.
She cosplays the cabbage merchant from avatar and she’s often self conscious about leaving the hotel room at cons, so i’m hoping you can help me make her popular on tumblr. she’s really cute and sweet and she worked so hard on this cosplay! she even carries around real cabbages please give her love ok

Anyone who cosplays the cabbage merchant is perfect. Parents who cosplay are even MORE perfect. THERE IS NOTHING HERE THAT IS NOT PERFECT.

sailormichelle:

hey everyone !
So my mom’s been feeling really down lately and i’m really hoping you guys can help me try to make her feel better.

She cosplays the cabbage merchant from avatar and she’s often self conscious about leaving the hotel room at cons, so i’m hoping you can help me make her popular on tumblr. she’s really cute and sweet and she worked so hard on this cosplay! she even carries around real cabbages please give her love ok

Anyone who cosplays the cabbage merchant is perfect. Parents who cosplay are even MORE perfect. THERE IS NOTHING HERE THAT IS NOT PERFECT.

(Source: starquartz, via waitforgravity)

Filed under cabbage man MY CABBAGES cosplay avatar: the last airbender