Flights of Fancy

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wired:

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]


They don’t make kid’s shows like they used to — not only in regards to actual content, but also in reference to the diversity of the casting.
Those were the days.

wired:

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

They don’t make kid’s shows like they used to — not only in regards to actual content, but also in reference to the diversity of the casting.

Those were the days.

Filed under all that I loved this show and grew up on it and never realized how radical it was but looking back...yeah. that was quite the show.

55 notes

Capcom:
So, its time for us to brainstorm Resident Evil 7.
Capcom:
The fans are clamoring for a return to Survival Horror
Capcom:
And we are going to GIVE THEM
Capcom:
THAT
Capcom:
by introducing fans to a completely new character with relations to the main cast but never brought up until now. all their tertiary background information will be in files found in the game. none of that on screen development bullshit
Capcom:
a new virus with interesting implications and hammy villians with force of nature personalities will be introduced who are promptly killed off or escape never to be mentioned again. except in an obtuse manner. in files. fans love those.
Capcom:
Chris, Jill, Leon, or Claire will appear and their actions in this installment will never be referenced again. except in one line of dialogue.
Capcom:
lastly, Quick Time Events!! at least one fatal explosion unless otherwise dodged with a button press per chapter
Capcom Intern:
what about reintroducing characters we haven't utilized in fifteen years. fans might want closure for Billy. Rebecca, Carlos, Barry. and mentioning character connections and friendships? Looking at it now it's like you don't ever have these characters talk.
Capcom:
....
Capcom:
...........
Capcom:
don't you ev- don't you ever say those words to us again

Filed under capcom resident evil so true it hurts I'll just be over here sobbing my sads away

1,913 notes

unicornempire:

Salt & Burn is finally available online! It’s been a long and winding road, but now you and your friends can hunt the things that go bump in the night! Play as a Hunter of the supernatural that travels the board, killing monster and saving lives. The first Hunter to save 10 lives wins the game! You can read more about the game in the Etsy listing or visit saltandburn.com to see other people playing the game and read the rules.

We also have the Bitten Booster Pack and the Brothers Booster Pack available, each one adding extra gameplay and alternate methods of play.

Due to problems with our laser cutter, we only have enough of the original laser-cut acrylic player tokens and hearts for 25-30 games. After those are sold, we’re going to be revisiting the game and replacing the tokens with cardboard chits, so if you want to get the full original game, here’s your chance. Thanks guys, happy hunting!

(via geek-studio)

Filed under holy balls i want it get in my life board games gorgeous design